Our blogs and videos choice: dna sequences

Synthetic Biology: Building Life (Potential & Dangers ...

But today, applications of our understanding of DNA in areas such as genetic engineering and cloning seem primitive compared to synthetic biology, a field in which the basic building blocks of life are pieced together from scratch to suit the needs of research, medicine, and the environment. Synthetic biology combines knowledge of genetics and cell biology with principles of engineering and is limited only by scientists’ imaginations.  But the field is still in its infancy, and initial ventures into figuring out how best to put the basic components of DNA together synthetically have [more...]

Date: 2009-03-10 17:15:19

Blog posts (57) | Videos (14)
 


DNA Transcription (Advanced)

Transcription is the process by which the information in DNA is copied into messenger RNA (mRNA) for protein production. Originally created for DNA Interactive ( http://www.dnai.org ). TRANSCRIPT The Central Dogma of Molecular Biology: “DNA makes RNA makes protein” Here the process begins. Transcription factors assemble at a specific promoter region along the DNA. The length of DNA following the promoter is a gene and it contains the recipe for a protein. A mediator protein complex arrives carrying the enzyme RNA polymerase. It manoeuvres the RNA polymerase into place… inserting it with [more...]

Date: 2010-10-03 03:02:09


Healing Dna With Light, Sound And Acupuncture

There are many other ways to enhance the torsion field in our body like sunlight, negatively charged fresh air, clean water, natural medicines, and healthy foods.   Another way to improve and repair DNA on a cellular level is acupuncture. Acupuncture can be used on the pericardium and heart meridians to activate the thymus gland and improve immune function. This can be very useful in treating autoimmune diseases. Increased the energy in these meridians can activate higher frequencies. Higher frequencies lead to lower cellular oxidation rates and less cellular aging. Acupuncture on the Du [more...]

Date: 2010-09-07 12:05:19


Antibody Therapies and the New Generation of DNA Sequencing ...

Our antibody database targets protein-coding genes. Although they form only 1% of the total human genome, they account for 85% of the mutations that lead to disease. DNA sequencing (defining the sequence of the 4 base amino acids within the DNA strand) and then using antibodies specific to those sequences, is a vital part of disease research. Sanger sequencing is the standard for doing this. However, in 2007 a next generation (or next gen) sequencing technique was devised. Lauded as the biggest advancement in genomics since microarray technology, it has radically improved diagnostic [more...]

Date: 2010-09-27 10:34:46


Think Out Loud Sizing Up Your Genes · Oregon Public Broadcasting

Now, a host of startup companies are selling at-home kits that promise to unlock the secrets of customers' DNA in a matter of weeks.  Intel employees, who get a discounts from two genetic testing companies, use the tests to reveal their genetic predisposition to everything from cancer to cellulite. But many in the medical community are skeptical of the tests' legitimacy, and the U.S. Government Accountability Office recently released a report calling the tests "misleading" and accusing the companies administering them of "questionable practices." Have you elected to use genetic testing? If [more...]

Date: 2010-08-11 16:00:00


Senior Software Engineer - SEQanswers

Complete Genomics is an emerging DNA sequencing technology with the promise of high throughput, low cost sequencing of human genomes. The technology has proven itself by sequencing of hundreds of human genomes for customers from research institutions to pharmaceutical giants to clinical researchers. Complete Genomics is aggressively pursuing innovations to aid its customers in the study of human disease and to push its service into vast new markets. It has filed an S1 for IPO. The assembly pipeline team is an amalgam of exceptional bioinformaticians and software engineers of diverse [more...]

Date: 2010-10-01 18:28:02


Popular Mechanics Posts 2010 BREAKTHROUGH Awards — The Gadgeteer

While working at the National Institutes of Health in the early 1990s, Venter developed a way to rapidly discover genes by exploiting snippets of DNA called expressed sequence tags. In 1992, he founded The Institute for Genomic Research, and, three years later, he and a team decoded the first genome of a free-living organism. That led to Venter’s best-known breakthrough, mapping the human genome. Last May, he achieved a defining moment in the history of biology when he inserted digitally created DNA into a living bacterium, forming the first synthetic life. His ultimate goal is to design [more...]

Date: 2010-09-28 20:43:25


Job4Dev - Bioinformatics & Machine Learning Expert em DNAnexus ...

DNAnexus is recruiting an expert in bioinformatics and machine learning to help architect and implement the next generation of scalable, intelligent algorithms for DNA sequence analysis. Requirements: Practical experience with Bayesian modeling and inference, machine learning, statistics, and optimization Familiarity with DNA sequence data, Smith-Waterman, BLAST, etc., and the ability to implement the algorithms Comfortable working in distributed environments and architecting parallel algorithms Fluent in C/C++ and understand the implications of your coding style down to the level of machine [more...]

Date: 2010-09-25 13:09:24


IVF News - Sperm linked to ART-related genetic disorders

A process called DNA methylation is critical to imprinting. A team led by Dr Takahiro Arima from Tohoku University examined DNA methylation in 78 six to nine-week-old embryos and fetuses conceived using ART, and 38 conceived without ART. They also examined the father's sperm and DNA. In seven of 17 cases where there was abnormal DNA methylation in the ART sample, identical alterations were present in the father's sperm. The abnormal DNA methylation in the sperm was associated with variations in a gene coding for DNMT3L - a key enzyme in DNA methylation associated with abnormal imprinting and [more...]

Date: 2009-12-07 08:00:00


Evolution News & Views: When "Junk DNA" Isn't Junk: Farewell to a ...

In the Darwinist repertoire, a standard response to evidence of design in the genome is to point to the existence of "junk DNA." What is it doing there, if purposeful design really is detectable in the history of life's development? Of course this assumes that the "junk" really is junk. That assumption has been cast increasingly into doubt. New research just out in the journal Nature Genetics finds evidence that genetic elements previously thought of as rubbish are anything but that. The research describes tiny strands of RNA, previously thought to be junk, that now turn out to play a role in [more...]

Date: 2009-04-28 16:20:29


CIENCIASMEDICASNEWS: Researchers report MALAT1 gene regulates pre ...

Researchers report this month that MALAT1, a long non-coding RNA that is implicated in certain cancers, regulates pre-mRNA splicing - a critical step in the earliest stage of protein production. Their study appears in the journal Molecular Cell. Nearly 5 percent of the human genome codes for proteins, and scientists are only beginning to understand the role of the rest of the "non-coding" genome. Among the least studied non-coding genes - which are transcribed from DNA to RNA but generally are not translated into proteins - are the long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Before the human genome was [more...]

Date: 2010-10-01 22:18:00


Assassin's Creed II Cheats : Latest Game Cheat Codes

Bloody Sunday (30): Complete DNA Sequence 4. Undertaker (20): Discover the Assassin’s Tomb inside the catacombs under Santa Maria Novella. The Conspirators (30): Complete DNA Sequence 5. An Unexpected Journey (30): Complete DNA Sequence 6. Bleeding Effect (30): Complete training and reenter the Animus. The Merchant of Venice (30): Complete DNA Sequence 7. The Impenetrable Palazzo (30): Complete DNA Sequence 8. Masquerade (30): Complete DNA Sequence 9. Bianca’s Man (30): Complete DNA Sequence 10. The Prophet (30): Complete DNA Sequence 11. The Vault (30): Complete DNA Sequence [more...]

Date: 2010-10-06 01:05:17


Mutant gene discovery in Jews may stop brain damage | Sevarth

As the disease is both severe and common, testing for these mutations will probably soon become a routine prenatal genetic screening test in these two populations so that future cases can be prevented, by carriers either not marrying each other or having children together, or by abortion or pre-genetic diagnosis to choose healthy embryos for in-vitro fertilization. Prof. Ohad Birk and doctoral student Orly Agamy of the National Institute for Biotechnology in the Negev at BGU and colleagues at Soroka University Medical Center in Beersheba demonstrated the first human disease associated with a [more...]

Date: 2010-10-12 07:23:13


50. Gene Technology 3 of 6 : : Dna Test

Finally we look at some of the tricks that can be done using these tools and techniques – such as DNA profiling and fingerprinting; how to sequence DNA – from a molecule to a letter code we can interpret; and finally we look at how cloning genes and the use of recombinant DNA technology allows us to mix the DNA of different species together. Lots of information. Always a [more...]

Date: 2010-10-12 23:20:03


skin cancer mapping | Cancer Blog

Investigators are still analyzing parts DNA from patients who are non-coded, and can still find other mutations, said Dr. Elaine Mardis, co-director of Center Sequencing genome at the University of Washington, and co-lead author of the study. But as she explained: The role of these mutations Non-coding is more difficult to solve because we do not yet fully understand the function of this part of the genome. Another interesting finding in this study was that when they compared the 8 new mutations in the patient with the DNA of tumor samples from 187 AML patients others there were no matches: [more...]

Date: 2010-10-12 17:22:34


EveryDay Science » Blog Archive » New roles for new genes ...

Thanks to new technological advances in genomic sequencing , we know that much of the DNA genome is transcribed into RNA but only a small portion of this RNA (transcriptome ) contains sequences that encode for the synthesis of proteins. Thus, although long RNA fragments are non-coding transcriptome most mammals, their cellular functions are still unknown. Scientists have already described the role of small RNAs in gene regulation but we still know very little about the long fragments . The long noncoding RNAs are RNA fragments longer than 100 nucleotides. The authors of this paper have shown [more...]

Date: 2010-10-01 14:35:23


Because no one will win the debate on human evolution!

All persons have the same 100% human genes and DNA sequence-based links to an African matriarch. I refer readers to 11th January 1988 cover story in Newsweek that the DNA of humans navigate on the River. This article has been shown that evolutionists have to search, but we are afraidWrite: All people are a unique rainbow family combined. We have the saliva, the same blood type, the same shit and the same disgusting habits: we are not many, but One Race A dysfunctional family! The fact that some pre-human species changed, does not mean that all people have done things before the same thing? [more...]

Date: 2010-10-09 17:50:37


The effect of DNA signals on nucleosome formation, chromatin ...

Much of the human genome is non-coding and it seems likely that at least some of the non-coding DNA is functionally important. However, only little is known about the possible function of the bulk of the human genome. Since essentially all the nuclear DNA is packaged into chromatin, it is likely that functional effects of non-coding DNA are mediated by the chromatin structure. By making use of human genomic sequence information now available, we showed that a specific set of periodic DNA motifs (period-10 VWG/CWB) encoded in genomic DNA is predicted to influence human chromosome function. The [more...]

Date: 2010-08-25 23:15:17


University of California - UC Newsroom | State order alters DNA ...

In July, incoming students received a packet of information about the DNA testing program, a saliva kit, an anonymous bar code to attach to the sample, and a consent form authorizing the campus to test for three gene variants that would reveal aspects of how an individual metabolizes milk, alcohol and vitamin B9 (folic acid). The campus has scheduled a series of lectures, panel discussions and class sessions - which will go on as planned - around the subject of genetic testing. "Of the three million genetic differences that distinguish any two people, we are testing only three common [more...]

Date: 2010-08-12 16:00:00


DNA repair causes damage - The Scientist - Magazine of the Life ...

A supposedly accurate DNA repair mechanism employed by cells to fix double-strand breaks can surprisingly increase the nearby mutation rate by up to 1400 times, providing a possible explanation for the accumulation of tumor-causing mutations in cancerous tissues. Previously, "we saw that DNA breaks are present in precancerous legions," said molecular oncologist Thanos Halazonetis of the University of Geneva, who did not participate in the research. "These breaks, based on this finding now, could perhaps explain mutations in oncogenes that drive cancer progression." Cancer [more...]

Date: 2007-08-27 07:00:00


CIENCIASMEDICASNEWS: New Functions For New Genes, Non-coding RNAs ...

DNA regions have been known for many years to confer both negative and positive regulation of protein synthesis. "The fact that RNA is much easier to manipulate than DNA could mean that this discovery has a vast therapeutic potential" explains Ørom. The work has been led by Ramin Shiekhattar, group leader at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona and now at the Wistar Institute and co-authored by Cedric Notredame and Roderic Guigo from the Bioinformatics and Genomics Programme at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG). Shiekhattar and collaborators have seen a new role for a [more...]

Date: 2010-10-08 13:03:00


O.N.L.Y 1 %: 10 Tips For Better DNA Gel Extraction Results

Nabi s.a.w bersabda, maksudnya: Jabir mengatakan bahawa Rasulullah s.a.w pernah bersabda, "Wahai manusia, aku telah meninggalkan untuk kalian 2 perkara. Jika kalian menggunakannya tidak akan tersesat selamanya iaitu Al-Quran dan Ahlul Bait keturunanku." (HR At-Tarmizi dan ia menghasankannya) What is it about gel extraction of DNA that makes it a pain? Maybe it’s poor product yields or maybe it’s because the process uses harsh chemicals (chaotropic salts, ethidium bromide, ethanol, heat) that will damage or denature DNA and potentially decrease cloning success. In this article I share some [more...]

Date: 2010-10-11 04:17:00


Welcome to Amino Acids: Amino Acid Translation

The process of copying genetic information from DNA into RNA is called____ protein synthesis replication transcription duplication translation DNA synthesis ___is unique to DNA. adenine cytocine uracil thymine guanine A mRNA sequence with 30 nucleotides codes for______ 15 amino acids 90 amino acids 10 amino acids 3 amino acids Translation is a process which converts the information in ____into ___ "DNA, mRNA" "mRNA, DNA" "protein, DNA" "mRNA, protein Get the answers... Missense mutation in which part of KRT5 gene does epidermolysis bullosa with mottled pigmentation form? (Answers: 1) [more...]

Date: 2008-01-19 08:00:00


Insights into watermelon genetic diversity

Insights into watermelon genetic diversity by Jeremy on September 29, 2010 There’s no doubt that most of the time when we non-experts think of genetic diversity in DNA terms, we think about alterations in the actual DNA sequence. Change the genetic code and there’s a chance you change the nature of a gene and as a result change the outward appearance, the phenotype, of an organism. There have been lots of studies relating the differences among species to differences in the DNA code of this sort, but far fewer looking at the differences among varieties of a single species. Amnon Levi and [more...]

Date: 2010-09-29 05:55:20


Junk DNA and Complexity Science: A Sad mix

A quote from an extremely mediocre book, Complexity: A Guided Tour. Like most people coming out of the 'complexity sciences', the author has a mediocre grasp of molecular biology, both current developments, and the history of the field. It's frustrating that these network people keep hyping supposedly new revolutionary discoveries made the past 10 years of the genome era - discoveries, that in fact have been known for decades. For people clearly new to biology, molecular biology before the year 2000 was a big black hole of ignorance. There are several claims that make me angry in this book, [more...]

Date: 2010-05-21 19:56:10


Blood tests for mitochondrial disease | MitoAction

MEDomics sequences the entire mitochondrial DNA genome thousands of times.  That sometimes allows the diagnosis of mitochondrial disease to be made with a blood sample rather than with painful muscle biopsies.  MitoDx is a test of unprecedented power for diagnosing mitochondrial genome disease, which is roughly ”half the elephant” of mitochondrial disease. Interesting download here - "How does mitochondrial disease manifest itself?"Join us this Thursday, September 16th, at noon Eastern time (US) -- dial in at 1-866-414-2828, participant code 017921#  -- as Dr. Sommer discusses:    * [more...]

Date: 2010-09-14 17:39:35


The cancer holy grail: DNA test will allow doctors to create ...

The researchers at Johns Hopkins took six sets of cancerous and normal tissue from four bowel and two breast cancer patients and “sequenced” – or decoded – the complete set of DNA for each patient. By comparing DNA from healthy and cancerous tissue, the researchers could spot where large parts of genetic code had been altered. These changes occur only in cancer cells, making them ideal biomarkers for the disease. Once the researchers found areas where DNA had been rearranged, they looked for the same changes in DNA shed from tumours into the patients” blood. Using blood samples [more...]

Date: 2010-09-29 21:36:09


Human DNA : Surprisingly Diverse

Human DNA : Surprisingly Diverse Agençe France-Presse 23 November 2006 Source: www.abc.net.au New investigations into the code for life suggest the assumption that humans are genetically almost identical is wide off the mark, and the implications could be resounding. Current thinking, inspired by the results five years ago from the Human Genome Project, is that the 6 billion humans alive today are 99.9% similar when it comes to genetic content and identity. But research published today in the journal Nature suggests we are genetically more diverse. The repercussions could be far-reaching [more...]

Date: 2010-10-08 11:11:33


Genetic Technologies Ltd.?s Non-coding DNA Patent Upheld on ...

s (GTG's) patent for non-coding DNA technologies.  U.S. Patent No. 5,612,179 titled "Intron sequence analysis method for detection of adjacent locus alleles as haplotypes" claims a method for facilitating the detection of specific gene variations. The third party initiated ex parte re-examination Control No. 90/010,318, was filed on October, 15, 2008 requesting that each of claims 26-32 be found invalid in view of a new reference, which was not previously cited in the prosecution of the '179 patent; namely a printed publication titled "Comparison of Multiple HLA-A Alleles at the [more...]

Date: 2010-07-13 16:50:00


Engineering Mini project: DNA COMPUTERS

After seven days of intensive laboratory work, Adleman's test-tube contained the answer to the problem, subsequently visible as a series of dark bands on a DNA sequencing gel. On the face of it, it might hardly seem worth the bother, especially as Adleman already knew the answer before he started the experiment. But this was much more than a curious laboratory stunt. During the initial 'linking-up' stage of the process, Adleman's test-tube computer effectively performed an astonishing 10^14 calculations. And it did so with the consumption of only a tiny amount of energy, and in a tiny [more...]

Date: 2010-10-12 10:10:00


Cyber-hugs and robot babies – a brave new world « Gleeful ...

Scientists in the US have just succeeded in developing the first living cell to be controlled entirely by synthetic DNA. The researchers copied an existing bacterial genome. They sequenced its genetic code and then used 'synthesis [more...]

Date: 2010-10-11 09:51:46


LinkNotes: The Science of Chocolate -- Preliminary Cacao Genome ...

Can science make chocolate taste (even) better? - The WeekScientists have cracked the DNA code of the cacao plant. Will our future selves be tempted by yet yummier sweets? Chocolate isn't an obvious candidate for a food that needs improving. But that hasn't deterred scientists at the candy conglomerate Mars, which recently announced they had nearly completed sequencing the cacao tree's genome. This could mean stronger, more resilient cocoa crops, and — perhaps down the road — better-tasting [more...]

Date: 2010-09-25 13:15:00


GENE DESIGN PROGRAM FROM JOHNS HOPKINS SIMPLIFIES, AUTOMATES AND ...

GeneDesign automates the process of determining which base pairs -- the building blocks of DNA -- should be linked together in a particular order to make a gene, according to Jef Boeke, Ph.D., professor of molecular biology and genetics and ... the tasks required to design and manipulate synthetic DNA sequences. The program allows the user to start with either the sequence of the amino acid making up the protein or the bases making up the gene that codes for that protein. [more...]

Date: 2006-02-15 08:00:00


FDA, Walgreens Puts Pathway Genetic Test Sales on Hold

FDA, Walgreens Puts Pathway Genetic Test Sales on Hold Walgreen’s drug stores originally had plans to launch the retail sale of an at-home genetic test on Friday that allows the consumer to assess his or her risk for diseases such as breast cancer, heart disease, and Alzheimer’s. The nation’s largest drugstore chain has opted to put sales on hold after an FDA warning that the test is not approved and could put consumers at risk. The test requires FDA authorization because it involves a device that allows consumers to collect their own DNA. The agency is also concerned about the fine [more...]

Date: 2010-05-13 12:20:02


Claim of Having Created Synthetic Life Is Far Overblown

A valid claim of creating synthetic life would require that – Even absent an agreed-upon ethics-based definition of “synthetic life,” a common sense definition would require that: (1) The synthetic DNA coding and sequencing not slavishly copy a known life form. Otherwise Life has done all the work in evolutionarily stumbling upon a coding sequence and organization that can self-replicate an organism on its own. (2) The synthesized DNA must either (a) code its own contents-enclosure (cell wall for bacteria) or (b) be placed in equally novel, human-created container, rather than [more...]

Date: 2010-06-18 13:37:40


MyJournals.org - 'Screening of the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1 ...

Screening of the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 in a Greek cohort of Lynch syndrome suspected families (BMC Cancer) Background: Germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair genes predispose to Lynch syndrome, thus conferring a high relative risk of colorectal and endometrial cancer. The MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 mutational spectrum reported so far involves minor alterations scattered throughout their coding regions as well as large genomic rearrangements. Therefore, a combination of complete sequencing and a specialized technique for the detection of genomic rearrangements should be [more...]

Date: 2010-10-11 16:25:57


William Hay, Writer: Da Vinci Code and Christian Flesh

Tom Hanks in Da Vinci Code finds the divine sequence in a DNA and that Divine sequence gets passed on through generations.  The actual DNA gene studies suggest that we all have all the DNA but that certain areas are blocked and others are highlighted.  It's more complicated than we once thought. We once thought that if we were missing a bit then we'd not have an eye per se but it turns out that the DNA like the Synapses are multi referenced and repeat so that really the 'code' is all there but it's not read for whatever reason.  Indeed the whole human genome is in a bit of buccal smear.  [more...]

Date: 2010-10-11 08:38:00


When the disease strikes – Who You Gonna Call?

Viruses can mutate (change their DNA or RNA structure), and therefore influenza strains provide researchers with the daunting task against the strain of the virus at their own gameTransfiguration, from different strains of the virus injection allows a vacation to make the body enough so that the antibodies in our immune system will not fall victim to a full-scale attack. Covering us with different strains in one shot, maybe some parts of the sequence of points in the immune system of our body, making these antibodies stimulated by these specific charges or other charges that some who have [more...]

Date: 2010-10-04 12:50:32


Medical Transcription From Home: What Is The Difference Between ...

DNA replication is the process by which one double helix of DNA is duplicated into two identical double helices which are also identical to the mother DNA. Translation is taking the RNA just made and using it to make a protein. Translation takes place after transcription of the genetic code into mRNA has been started. Translation refers to protein synthesis, in which proteins are made by reading the sequence information after the mature and processed mRNA by a ribosome. To me, transcription still refers to transcribing from a recording. But I thought you might want to find out why you’re [more...]

Date: 2010-08-05 18:01:00


Obsessed With Genes (Not Jeans), This Teen Analyzes Family DNA ...

The Wests signed up in 2007 and gave 23andMe genetic testing as Christmas presents to family members. From that experience, Mr. West learned that Anne also inherited the mutation on the Factor V gene that increases the risk of a pulmonary embolism. He wanted to know more. By last year, whole genome sequencing was not only being offered to individuals, but the price had dropped enough that Mr. West raised the idea at dinner. “Dad got curious about the whole family,” Anne says. Biology has been a passion of hers since the fifth grade. She works at the family computer in a room with a view [more...]

Date: 2010-10-01 18:33:20


Artificial Life Created in a Laboratory for the First Time ...

They manufactured a new chromosome from artificial DNA in a test tube, then transferred it into an empty cell and watched it multiply – the very definition of being alive. The man-made single cell “creature”, which is a modified version of one of the simplest bacteria on earth, proves that the technology works. Now Dr Venter believes organism, nicknamed Synthia, will pave the way for more complex creatures that can transform environmental waste into clean fuel, vaccinate against disease and soak up pollution. But his development has also triggered debate over the ethics of “playing [more...]

Date: 2010-05-21 13:46:05


Dienekes' Anthropology Blog: mtDNA of Yemeni and Ethiopian Jews

The way I see it, only a large-scale study of all global Jewish populations may uncover verified ancient Jewish lineages for both Y-chromosomes and mtDNA. The recent studies on Jews have uncovered several genetic sub-clusters of Jews, and only lineages that occur in 2 or more of these clusters, and preferably geographically separated ones have a strong claim of representing original Jewish lineages. There is a limit on what can be uncovered about the past from the study of living populations. American Journal of Physical Anthropology doi: 10.1002/ajpa.21360 Mitochondrial DNA reveals distinct [more...]

Date: 2010-07-14 18:00:00


Al Fin: A Hint of Epigenetics

We are learning that the genetic code is only the short, first chapter in a very long book. The non-genetic "code" -- the non-coding DNA and RNA -- has a logic all its own. We are just beginning to decrypt the obscure cipher. The possibilities for the transformation of life as we know it seem just as grandiose as were the hopes of the early promoters of the human genome enterprise. Only this time, we are working at a deeper level of sophistication. How many more levels will we need to descend before we reach the promised land of genetic medicine? ... some 95 or 98 percent of human DNA was [more...]

Date: 2010-10-13 15:07:00


PLoS ONE: Analysis of Short Tandem Repeats by Parallel DNA Threading

Abstract TopThe majority of studies employing short tandem repeats (STRs) require investigation of several of these genetic markers. As such, we demonstrate the feasibility of the trinucleotide threading (TnT) approach for scalable analysis of STRs. The TnT method represents a parallel amplification alternative that addresses the obstacles associated with multiplex PCR. In this study, analysis of the STR fragments was performed with capillary gel electrophoresis; however, it should be possible to combine our approach with the massive 454 sequencing platform to considerably increase the [more...]

Date: 2009-11-13 08:00:00


Evolution News & Views: "Junk" DNA: Darwinism's Last Stand?

In 1980, Francis Crick and Leslie Orgel argued in Nature that "much DNA in higher organisms is little better than junk." The spread of junk DNA in the course of evolution "can be compared to the spread of a not-too-harmful parasite within its host." Since it is unlikely that such DNA has a function, "it would be folly in such cases to hunt obsessively for one." In a companion article, W. Ford Doolittle and Carmen Sapienza similarly argued that many organisms contain "DNAs whose only 'function' is survival within genomes," and that "the search for other explanations may prove, if not [more...]

Date: 2009-06-04 16:00:00


Genetic fingerprint | Courtesy, This, There, Some | Knowledge ...

DNA is composed of a chain of sequences consisting of the four bases , A, T, C, and G. Some of these sequences code for the manufacture of proteins : they are called genes . There are other sequences of DNA that do not code for any proteins. A number of these latter sequences are specific to each individual and, therefore, constitute a genetic signature. This signature is called a genetic fingerprint. Courtesy : http://www.cite-sciences.fr/lexique/definition1.php?idmot=54&rech_lettre=g&num_page=5&habillage=glp&lang=an&id_expo=2&id_habillage=64 Tags: genetic This entry was posted on [more...]

Date: 2010-10-06 18:25:08


UC Davis News & Information :: Brain Gene Shows Dramatic ...

In a computer-based search for pieces of DNA that have undergone the most change since the ancestors of humans and chimps diverged, "Human Accelerated Region 1" or HAR1, was a clear standout, said lead author Katie Pollard, assistant professor at the UC Davis Genome Center and the Department of Statistics. "It's evolving incredibly rapidly," Pollard said. "It's really an extreme case." As a postdoctoral researcher in the lab of David Haussler at UC Santa Cruz, Pollard first scanned the chimpanzee genome for stretches of DNA that were highly similar between chimpanzees, mice and rats. Then [more...]

Date: 2006-08-16 07:00:00


DNA: The Tree of Life ( Humanity Hacking Immortality )

Visit my website http Seek Knowledge for “Life” Music by korn (Evolution) Visit my blog key-universe.blogspot.com DNA en.wikipedia.org Nucleic acid en.wikipedia.org Genetics en.wikipedia.org Protein en.wikipedia.org RNA en.wikipedia.org Polymer en.wikipedia.org Nucleotide en.wikipedia.org Nucleobase en.wikipedia.org Genetic code en.wikipedia.org Amino acid en.wikipedia.org Chromosome en.wikipedia.org DNA replication en.wikipedia.org Eukaryote en.wikipedia.org Helix en.wikipedia.org DNA sequencing en.wikipedia.org Junk DNA en.wikipedia.org Triple-stranded DNA en.wikipedia.org History of [more...]

Date: 2010-08-27 22:27:16


Scientists Create First Living Synthetic Cell With Computer, Mix ...

TORONTO – In revolutionary research that may end up altering our definition of life, scientists have created the first synthetic cell powered by artificially created DNA. The achievement caps 15 years of work by a large team of researchers, led by Craig Venter of Human Genome Project fame, who engineered a chromosome and inserted it into a bacterium to create a new living entity. ``This is the first self-replicating species that we’ve had on the planet whose parent is a computer,’’ Venter told a teleconference presented Thursday by the journal Science, which published the work. The [more...]

Date: 2010-05-21 14:21:11


Evolution News & Views: Guy Walks Into a Bar and Thinks He's a ...

Part of the reason for this is if one decides to take into account the plethora of species-specific DNA insertions and deletions ("indels") that are present along any segment compared between chimp and human, the percentage of identity drops. Another reason is that duplications, inversions, translocations, and transpositions at all scales uniquely characterize the two genome sequences -- these have to be untangled before aligning the sequences in order to measure their similarity. Also, the 99% identity figure is often derived from protein-coding regions that only comprise about 1.5% of the [more...]

Date: 2009-05-14 19:06:54



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1 what instrumentation is required dna sequence analysis / base sequence / code sequence / sequence alignment software / sequence analysis / sequence example / sequence gene / human dna sequence / what instrumentation is required dna sequence analysis /